Fishing

Imagine fishing in 24 hours of daylight under the glowing Arctic sun in fast flowing rivers, the cleanest lakes on earth or along the rugged coastline of the Arctic Ocean. We’ve been doing it for thousands of years for food and for fun. Now imagine how much knowledge our local guides have to share with you about the right places, the exact spots, the right time and the best tackle and gear to make a fishing adventure in Nunavut the fish story of your life.

Tangle with Arctic Char, struggle with aggressive Graylings, cast for trophy-sized Pike and catch the Lake Trout of a lifetime: this is sport fishing in Nunavut.

World Class and World Record Sport Fishing

Before we go on, allow us to brag for moment — fishers in Nunavut hold 6 world records with the International Game Fish Association — from a saltwater all tackle record 32 pound Arctic Char to a freshwater fly rod record Lake Trout of 28 pounds. Now, for the cast: 

The class of the fish school in Nunavut is the Arctic Char – both freshwater and saltwater from the far north to our coastal rivers, from bright red to orange-pink, the char is the most common, yet hardest-hitting fish to catch and eat in Nunavut; so popular with the Inuit people we usually just call it iqaluk - ‘fish’ in Inuktitut.

There are freshwater Walleye up to 30 inches and 15 pounds, giant bragging-rights-size Lake Trout (51 pounds on Ennedai Lake) and Brook Trout, perfect for fly fishing in the shallow streams of Kivalliq region go up to 7 pounds. The carnivorous freshwater Great Northern Pike reaches 55 pounds - giving you some of the best battles at both ends of the line. The Arctic Grayling with its distinct dorsal fin is a feisty freshwater fish that abounds in our lakes, rivers and streams – great to catch and better to eat. And the freshwater Whitefish, sought for its fine flavour and golden caviar roe.

We’re ready to go fishing when you are. In communities across Nunavut there are fishing or wilderness lodges and expert outfitters and guides for excellent fishing adventures from the southern tree-line to the northern islands, from ice-fishing in the spring and world-class sport fishing through the summer and fall.